About your Search

20130122
20130122
SHOW
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 22
MSNBCW 20
SFGTV2 16
CNNW 13
CSPAN2 11
FBC 7
KGO (ABC) 7
WHUT (Howard University Television) 7
CSPAN 6
KQED (PBS) 6
CNBC 5
COM 5
KNTV (NBC) 5
KPIX (CBS) 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 177
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 179 (some duplicates have been removed)
by board members. any appointments this evening? seeing none. i am pleased to introduce our elections commission report. delivered by our election commission appointee, catalina ruiz-healy. you can sit here. if you would like. >> good evening. superintendent, and new president and vice president and commissioners. thanks for having me. i was honored to receive your appointment in march, 2011, to be your appointee to the commission for the san francisco election department. you have received a memo from me. and i can go over it quickly, and i hope you had a chance to read it. but basically the city charter authorizes the election commission to supervisor the elections. and we are charged with a fairly narrow scope of work, for generally setting the department of elections and for the proper administration of the department. so the budget and we hire and fire the department of elections. so take a breath here. the way that the commission works on their on and off years. in 2011 our work focused on operations and less on policy. because we are getting ready to implement elections in the
kicks off his second term with a call for national unity. >> a regional election in germany, a wakeup call for the chancellor. >> and extreme winter weather halts travel across much of northern europe. >> we start this show in washington where president obama balm has publicly taken the oath of office for his second term. he had to take it twice. >> official ceremony held in private on sunday at the white house. now the ceremonial swearing in in front of more than 700,000 people that showed up. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries deman
with election of the office of president of the board of supervisors. >> president: on january 8, the board of supervisors is required to select the president from its members with a majority vote under city charter. madam clerk can you describe the principles. >> boys requirements state that there are no extensions; all supervisors must vote; lowest vote getter is not obligated to withdraw the name and will continue to be included in subsequent ballots. nominated name can withdraw their name anytime. as the president stated in the event that no nominee receives a majority vote the shelby additional roll calls until the nominee receives the majority and president is elected. the names of the supervisors who have been nominated for the election to the office a board president are: supervisor david chiu, supervisor cohen supervisor kim. board rule 5/20 states that the roll call vote will take place enough of a quarter. supervisor avalos will begin with you. please indicate your preference from among the money stated. >> president: we have a little bit of discussion. supervisor kim.
are coming out on the streets and to vote in an election that matters. >> we'll be live with the latest on the french intervention and where north africa is the new front in the battle against terrorism. and we will be asking why the issue of abortion is still so divided. a special report from mississippi. >> also aaron is taking a look at global unemployment, and that is a huge number, aaron. >> it's a staggering number. 197 million people around the world are now without a jofpblet 13% are under 24. are we creating a generation of non-workers? >> it's 12:00 moon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem where more than 5.5 million israeliings are expected to vote? an election that is expected to see benjamin netanyahu return to office. he is facing relidgeous parties and while security seen by many as netanyahu's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking
the director of the department of elections or to certifying the official election of the order supervisors. districts 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11. and have been declared elected to that office. supervisor: mar, chiu, breed, campos, avalos. the second communication is a communication from the controller renewing the certification of the bond for the newly elected in the elected members of the board of supervisors. >> we will now proceed to the oath of office. >> i would like to welcome and introduce the honorable cynthia ming-mei lee, presiding judge, supuerior court of california. who will administer the oath of office to the following individuals: david campos eric mar john avaols myself mornam yee london breed. >> judge lee: good to be here. please come forward. would the supervisors being sworn in prer fer to stand? you all have to agree on. >> judge lee: would you all please raise your right hand? please state your name after "i". repeat after me. i do solemnly swear or affirm that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states. and the constitution of the state of calif
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
and elsewhere around the globe. israelis went to the polls in general elections today. prime minister jet -- prime minister benjamin netanyahu claimed victory after exit polls showed he would likely lead, the government with a narrow majority. our correspondent is in jerusalem with the latest. >> welcome to jerusalem after three months of a lackluster election campaign. suddenly, israeli politics came alive today about an hour before the polls closed. there was growing excitement and speculation. as expected, benjamin netanyahu is likely to lead the next government. he will be the prime minister for the next four years, but it is a weakened prime minister. his coalition did not get the number of seats it wanted. only 31, according to exit polls. that is down from the 42 that the two parties had during the last election. what kind of coalition will be formed? it could be the right and religious parties. that is not what he wants. the television presenter, his party came in second place. he said his party will not expect to be in any coalition. will it be a shaky coalition between the right
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
hostage? >> we would say broken because lots of energy goes into electing these senators individually and then the results are almost nothing. so that's why we would say broken. you could definitely say it's held hostage. but we would say broken because i think regardless of how the deck is, stacks up, republicans, independents and democrats it should not function this way. i mean, we really do believe that. you know, we think our members and working people in this country and most americans would say it's fair. people get elected. at some point, the majority should rule. and that's the way it is in every other democracy in the world. >> but as we talk what's up with harry reid? he does seem to be backing away from the strong reform that you propose. i brought a story from talkingpointsmemo.com. senate majority leader harry reid is voicing support for a set of changes to the current filibuster rules that would fall far short of the more sweeping proposals from people like mr. cohen. what's he -- what's up? >> well, i think part of what's up is he's got four or five mocrats, many of th
bhfer you take votes right away from certain conconstituentcy to none elected officials it problematic and secondly it can be open to litigation and the purpose of this is to protect focus it will counties and the taxpayers in san francisco and this does not have any profession to the rate pairs or taxpayers of san francisco for any litigation that may come about as as a result of this amendment and i urge you to consider that before you pass this amendment and lastly, it doesn't involve all of the key stakeholders in this conversation. the city of california, has determined that the economic value of restoring hetch hetchy would be $6 billion annually to the people of california and therefore, i think that is 6 billion reasons why they are key stakeholders in this process and so, we would urge you would amend or revise or have more conversation truly about this issue by requiring that instead of providing veto power to unelect of the power on the peninsula require an elect toarl component to the region it may represent and put it directly to the voters of the from a and if you are go
not expect to witness an election won by overinflate. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenge
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
forward to working with each and every one of my colleagues who i was so fortunate when i was elected they all reached out to me; they all sat down with me, phone calls and everyone. know that you district 5 supervisor will have the support of so many people in city hall to get the job done. the job for me, the priority for me will be of course jobs. supervisor avalos has started it would local hire, and i want to expand on that to really get to the bottom of making sure that our people and our district and our city have employment opportunities i cannot .way to get started on my job and i look forward to working with all of you. thank you for being here, and sticking it out through this day. i hope i did not miss anyone. congratulations to the new president of the board. looking forward to seeing you serve the next few years, and hoping that in another two years they will be the potential for change in thank you so much for having % i hope that wasn't mean or anything % didn't mean to cut your legs off while i was out there. i am so honored and happy to be here and looking fo
as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and the horse are on steroids coming in to fund the campaign. but we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a minor that cared towards election and not towards governing. >> host: president gutmann come at you right to chew in your co-author, dennis thompson as we observe the changing scene in american politics, we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. why is that? >> guest: if you want to see the problem with the uncompromising mindset, look no further than the 112th congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets past the least legislation in the last 50 years. why? everybody's campaigning all the time. there's very little by way of relationships across the aisle and we ran up to a break of the debt ceiling crisis in compromise was reac
, and fighting in elections to change the supreme court. >> what would you think of having a national general assembly modeled on the original continental congress in philadelphia beginning on july 4 of 2012? coming up with a list of grievances that this assembly debated. >> lawrence blessing has talked about a new constitutional convention. i think it is early. i think it is tricky. i do not mean to sound too conservative. when you say to make a list of grievances, we could sit in this room and come up with a list of six ideas or grievances that need to be made real and lead to change. you need to find your issue, work in your community. work in the organizing around the issue. link up with groups doing work. if it is student debt, find ways to take on the banks, local legislators, and congress in the short term. is not very revolutionary. at the event we did on 9/11, i said i felt this country was in a pre-revolutionary moment. it was about a week before occupy was street launched. i believe in evolution, not revolution. >> katrina, did you read the foreign affairs article that backs up the
. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay. i declare that the floor is open for the nomination of president for board 2013. >> i would like to nominate our current vice president, rachel norton. >> any further? if no more, i declare the nomination closed. >> commissioner norton, i would like to move that we elect commissioner norton by acclimation. that needs a second. >> second. >> any other discussion? okay, we are good. thank you very much. [applause] i have the pleasure to announce that i have been elected president of the board. [laughter] i am now declaring nominations open for the office of vice president of the board of education for the year of 2013. any nominations? commissioner mendoza. >> it would be my honor to nominate sa
that struck me about this conversation is something that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are talking about. in this measure. we are talking about giving hope to so many people who live in parts of this country, parts of the world where they cannot fathom being true to who they are; they cannot fathom being honest to themselves let alone other people about their sexual orientation. something that struck me about
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a prime election. benjamin netanyahu is expected to keep his job. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." central bank policy makers have agreed to give shinzo abe what he wants, a 2% inflation target. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan and eight others agreed on it saying they. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, i
that they're willing to work with this president? now that he has won two elections, and clearly the last one? >> you know, i hope so. we talk off camera -- >> you don't sound confident. >> well, here is the thing there are a lot of good folks in the republican caucus. i want to say that. and i mean that. but once they start voting, will they vote their conscience or will they vote what the tea party extremists demand. and that is the question. that's a question they have to answer. now some of their leaders said we're going to give -- we're going to take him out. our key agenda is to take out obama and make him a one-term president. they failed. i hope enough republicans are out there to do what is right now. >> congressman, four years ago tonight, there were a group of republicans that met at a restaurant. >> yes, there was. >> that set the course of obstruction. and they said we're going to say no to everything. what kind of dinner are they going to have tonight? >> is crow on the menu? >> i said that earlier today in our broadcast. they should probably be serving that today. but the p
concern. i want to play something that ted cruz, newly elected texas senator, republican, had to say this weekend, about gun control. and let's come back and talk about it. >> you know, there actually isn't the so-called gun show loophole, that doesn't exist. any licensed firearm dealer that else at a gun show has to have a background check. what it doesn't apply to is personal sales, one on one. and that's true whether it's at a gun show or -- >> i would point out, the key there is a licensed firearm dealer. some of these people, you can sort of apply as a, you know, you sell at a gun show occasionally, that's the gun show loophole. but, ted cruz gets to speak for lots and lots of people. how do you navigate, whether it's in delaware or nationally with what your father is trying to do, how do you navigate the politics of this? there's a reason the assault weapons ban sunseted in '04, because the politics of it simply didn't sustain. there's a reason barack obama didn't talk all that much about it in 2008. how do you keep the momentum to do something? >> the facts are important. sena
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down
this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some push-back already. darrell issa said quote, i'm hoping the president will recognize that compromise should have been the words for today and they clearly weren't. john mccain said i would have liked to see a little more on outreach and working together. there was not, as i have seen in other inaugural speeches. i want to work with my colleagues. and i'm wondering what you think about this approach and i think that
's say, the campaign manager for a judge -- because we have elections -- if anybody's interested -- let me just finish that. if you are a campaign manager, he cannot appear before that judge. the aba spent two years on a report called justice in jeopardy, which is online, and it talks about how judges are elected in every single state. one of the document you might be interested in because i understand you have had vigorous talks about this recently is immigration. the aba just issued several months ago the most comprehensive immigration reform report in the last two decades. it contains 10,000 pro bono lawyer hours of some of the best law firms in america. part of the frustration that exists regarding immigration -- and i was just at a white house meeting monday and tuesday of this week on this issue -- it relates to the anchor -- the anger people have saying that is broken and we cannot fix it and there's nothing we can do. that is wrong. we have an ability to fix the problem. we should fix the problem. the aba rendered a report that it will continue to act as a resource in fixing the
of elected throughout the state and community leaders as well and we are hopeful that this will be a template for what wedo in this case and that we get a similar level of success to make sure had a money goes back to the people who are victim iressed and that they get the restitution that they deserve and i would like to introduce michael papist from the enter face-to-face 98 counsel because he was a big part in making sure we got our effort out to the 98 community and to make sure that borrowers who were vimsed got the restitution they deserved and we are happy he is cooperating in our effort for the next 90 days. >> p oop pennsylvania a s.-the san francisco enter fate counsel is absolutely indebted if you will forgive the pun to his city treasure her heira in this suspicious when this program started. we believe that the victims of predatory lending are sill the in in our pews and we work with faith-based organization to provide the safety yet and net and we are here today to commit ourselves again to the good work that dennis is doing and in the past, we have used our technology networ
that republicans should whine about. he did win the election he's entitled to try this very liberal strategy and see if it succeeds for him and if it's the way to get his agenda through. i tend to have my doubts. we're all going to find out. >> brown: rev. hamilton, by your role you get involved in all the social issues of our time. did you hear the president making a kind of aggressionive statement about, "this is the way forward for all of us" or did you hear him reaching out to embrace people, to help create that? >> i think it's a great question. i wish he had done more to reach out. in fact that was the point of my message today at the national cathedral was to say, you know, we need a new american vision that's not just democratic or not just republican. it has to be a new vision that brings people together. if we had a new vision with key strategic goals that republicans and democrats have crafted together and say this is what we're going to work together over the next ten years, it would have a huge impact on bringing americans together. i wish that he had done more of that >> brown:
pleasure to introduce the president elect of the bar association of san francisco. they provide conflict attorneys to handle cases when a defender is not available. >> i am the president elect of the bar association. we're very proud to co-sponsor the justice of it. on behalf of the 8000 members, and all of those who -- dedicate their careers -- we are very fortunate to have his leadership with top-notch legal representation. for those who were charged each year who are innocent. an important part of the mission is providing equal access to justice. this is shared by his office and all the public defenders. we're proud of the conflict panel that he described, and we also provide the top-notch representation in matters that his office cannot handle. we applaud you for what you do and for those of you who could not make it, thank you very much. this year's public defender simon will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me becaus
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
said that after this election, the fever would break. are we looking at the fact that there is a broken fever and maybe that is the first step, that both sides are going to be willing to work together not for the advancement of individual party but for the advancement of this country? >> well, i'm encouraged by that. i think we are seeing some pragmatism on the republican side. i think we are seeing some good ideas come out, like no budget, no pay, which is something no labels has been pushing for a long time. we're seeing democrats on the senate side saying they are finally going to put forward a budget after four years, because budget is policy so i think we're seeing some thawing on both sides and some common sense coming forward because people realize that these problems are too big and we've got -- the only way to solve them is if we're going to come together. >> all right. so this is about the enduring ideas and finally, i just want to leave off with this. the national journal saying post-partisan no more. history doesn't make excuses. if obama's agenda fails because republicans d
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
that make this country great. >> i saw that as essentially sort of a bottom line on the election that got him to this day. >> yes. >> maybe a signal about what is to come in terms of the governing fights in washington. >> absolutely. it is quite likely that there will be some give and some compromise. but he is creating a bottom line here beyond which he will not go. and that is a very strong signal for these budget fights to come. but writ more broadly, i was thinking of martin luther king jr. and of equal rights and of the refrain that, you know, our job is not done, what he basically was saying is our journey is not complete, to use his words. >> our journey is not complete. those are the two repeated phrases. our journey is not complete, and you and i as citizens, you and i. >> exactly. this is an exclusive moment. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are recognized as equal under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right this. and he talked about stonewall. ta talking about stonewall in
progress in the last election. >> john: here is a comment from the present that should resonate with any remaining mitt romney fans. >> obama: we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the view. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare, and medicaid, and social security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> john: david, that couldn't have been more pointed if he turned to paul ryan and said that line directly to him. do you think he was sending a message across the bell? >> i hope he's sending a message. a lot of progressives look at that and say wait a second, is that the same president who was willing to support the change in social security, or is he going to stand firm. the rhetoric sounds good but how does the president act? what a
, working to desegregate the deep south. >> the fact that obama could be elected again shows that the stone of hope, it came out of the mountain of despair that king spoke of and there is hope. >> reporter: a sentiment likely shared by so many on the mall today, including the man they all came to see. cecilia vega, abc news, washington. >>> and here again, george stephanopoulos, great to spend the day with you. so, did anything happen today that changed the political possibilities? >> i don't think so. one day, one speech cannot dot that. even though this is the day where all of america comes together, and that was one of the big themes of the president's speech. but one of the things i did think we saw today was a very changed president. and this is a very different time and a very different president from the one who took office four years ago. the speech four years ago, a dark speech. for a dark time. we were mired in crisis. the economy beginning to come back. and what you saw today is, the president gave a meditation on freedom and equality. it was a president who else felt free. >> an
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
, elected officials and public. i stand to be in a great deal of excitement because within our african-american tradition we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. i congratulate those who have been elected on this most auspicious occasion. i want to say that i think it is very good that supervisor cohen was selected as the person to be president. and i want to offer my own support of that cause. supervisor breed, you stated something about doctor king. i thought i might leave this quote with you. for doctor king said, "change does not roll in on the wheels of ineligibility, but comes through continuous struggle. men cannot ride you unless your back is bent." i hope you see this time of change of having a woman of color as a president of this board. >> president: next speaker. >> good day board. president chiu and other board members here. my name is ross rhodes, as part of the organization call ace. i'm here speaking on behalf of my other fellow brothers and sisters in the organizations about foreclosures and evictions in all of our districts
directly to the goals of the more diverse and more social coalition that re-elected him. for the first time in an inaugural speech, explicitly mentioning gay rights. >> if we are truly created equal, the love we give one another must be equal, as well. >> reporter: he spoke about climate change, equal pay for women and immigration reform. >> our journey is not complete until we find a way to welcome the thriving, hopeful immigrants who see america as a land of opportunity. >> reporter: the president paused during many of the day's special moments, seeming to take it all in, knowing this would be his last inauguration. some republicans thought president obama's speech was too partisan. with divided government here in washington, he will need some gop support to pass his big agenda items. rob? paula? >> all right. tahman bradley live in washington. we had breaking news that part of the president's second term is going to get you a new hat. >> reporter: stop that. it's warm, though, okay? >> that's all that matters. >> easy for us to say, warm in the studio. >> he's doing the hard work. thank
and for the nation that re-elected the president. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> president obama never used the words "democrat" or "republican" in his second inaugural address, but his political message was crystal clear. a full-throated embrace of progressive policies, along with a directive for our leaders to spear head the challenges that define us as individuals and as a country. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare, medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. we will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. we, the people, still believe enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. and we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized. the victims of prejudice. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. our journey is not comp
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a general election. prime minister netanyahu is expected to keep his job. but the country may shift further to the right. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." japan's central bank policymakers agreed to give shinzo abe what he's been pushing for, a 2% inflation target. it's included in the boj plan with the government. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan governor and eight other board members agreed on a policy at the end of a two-day meeting. the announcement says financial authorities will try to reach the target at their earliest possible time. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new prog
's not that hard. there once was a man name barack who's re-election came as a shock. he raised the taxes i pay and then turned marriage gay. and now he's coming after your glock. [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] poet laureate, please. now, i'm not going to do a critical deconstruction of obama's partisan screed masquerading as an inaugural speech. now is not the time to criticize. i will just say this, it was a clear call for a radical, collectivist agenda. listen to this language. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. we, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. for we, the people-- we, the people-- we-- we-- we-- >> stephen: we, we, we. all the way home. [ laughter ] this little piggy is sick of it! socialist overreach is coming. by february we'll all be chained up in solar-powered asparagus gulags being force-fed birth control pills by illegal immigrants who gay-marry us to endangered sea turtles. [ laughter ] my advice: find a good looking turtle-mate soon; you don't wa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 179 (some duplicates have been removed)